nocturnal-lullaby:

How To Erase The Outline Of Your Being  by yummiyumi on Flickr.


The best way to succeed in life is to act on the advice we give to others.


may10baby:

shrineart:

joyfulldreams:

senpaibowie:

etirabys:

skull-bearer:

lolatsjw:

ifonlyfor:

nouveau-brut:

humansofnewyork:

"Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular."

I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races. 

^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though.

Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good.

When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares.

Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing.
'Appropriation' is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things.
Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress.
uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook.

Thank you!!

I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug-

Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me.

As a Korean-American I can tell you that all these social justice bloggers acting like the Appropriation Police are often missing the whole idea of fighting against cultural appropriation.
Dressing up and/or actively participating in parts of a foreign culture is not cultural appropriation. Whether it’s wearing Asian clothing or eating cultural foods, this is not actively disrespectful, therefore not insulting. Koreans have a lot of national pride, meaning that when my friends praise or openly enjoy aspects of my culture I am happy and not at all pissed about it.
The reason cultural appropriation is viewed with such negativity is because of various disrespectful acts taken against other cultures, such as drunken hipsters wearing Indian headdresses at parties. That’s the American equivalent of pissing on a Vietnam veteran’s medals and then laughing about it later.
There’s a difference between embracing someone’s culture and disrespecting it. Keep that in mind before you shame someone for wanting to see a different side of the world.
I mean, unless you wanted whites to do purely white things and Asians to do purely Asian things, etc and basically bring back segregation, then totally, keep tearing people’s self esteem to shreds because they thought “oh hey! That kimono’s so pretty! I want to try it on!”

may10baby:

shrineart:

joyfulldreams:

senpaibowie:

etirabys:

skull-bearer:

lolatsjw:

ifonlyfor:

nouveau-brut:

humansofnewyork:

"Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular."

I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races. 

^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though.

Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good.
When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares.

Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing.

'Appropriation' is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things.

Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress.

uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook.

Thank you!!

I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug-

Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me.

As a Korean-American I can tell you that all these social justice bloggers acting like the Appropriation Police are often missing the whole idea of fighting against cultural appropriation.

Dressing up and/or actively participating in parts of a foreign culture is not cultural appropriation. Whether it’s wearing Asian clothing or eating cultural foods, this is not actively disrespectful, therefore not insulting. Koreans have a lot of national pride, meaning that when my friends praise or openly enjoy aspects of my culture I am happy and not at all pissed about it.

The reason cultural appropriation is viewed with such negativity is because of various disrespectful acts taken against other cultures, such as drunken hipsters wearing Indian headdresses at parties. That’s the American equivalent of pissing on a Vietnam veteran’s medals and then laughing about it later.

There’s a difference between embracing someone’s culture and disrespecting it. Keep that in mind before you shame someone for wanting to see a different side of the world.

I mean, unless you wanted whites to do purely white things and Asians to do purely Asian things, etc and basically bring back segregation, then totally, keep tearing people’s self esteem to shreds because they thought “oh hey! That kimono’s so pretty! I want to try it on!”





gazzymouse:

disneytasthic:

latenightjimmy:

The Full House guys reunite to give Jimmy some encouragement before the Tonight Show.

This was so awesome <3 <3

Stamos hasn’t aged a day and it always kind of freaks me out.

(Source: fallontonight)



yolandashoshana:

Instagram Oracle: This is a channeled message from an Archangel I work with all the time, Metatron. He is here to give you the power to focus and prioritize. What makes your heart sing? No matter what it may be, Metatron is here to help you with your life’s mission. It is all about your choices. Time to get moving on your priorities, that is when you will start to see change in your life. Going through the motions can only take you so far. What you desire in life is closer than you think. Choose to be ready, willing, and able to go for it! Love and light! #tarot #angels #oracle #clairvoyant #badassbruja #lovesexmagick

yolandashoshana:

Instagram Oracle: This is a channeled message from an Archangel I work with all the time, Metatron. He is here to give you the power to focus and prioritize. What makes your heart sing? No matter what it may be, Metatron is here to help you with your life’s mission. It is all about your choices. Time to get moving on your priorities, that is when you will start to see change in your life. Going through the motions can only take you so far. What you desire in life is closer than you think. Choose to be ready, willing, and able to go for it! Love and light! #tarot #angels #oracle #clairvoyant #badassbruja #lovesexmagick



GPOY

(Source: sandandglass)



ombuddha:

In Tibet we say: “Negative action has one good quality: it can be purified.” So there is always hope. Even murderers and the most hardened criminals can change and overcome the conditioning that led them to their crimes. Our present condition, if we use it skillfully and with wisdom, can be an inspiration to free ourselves from the bondage of suffering.
Sogyal Rinpoche.
Photo by anasshafiq.

ombuddha:

In Tibet we say: “Negative action has one good quality: it can be purified.” So there is always hope. Even murderers and the most hardened criminals can change and overcome the conditioning that led them to their crimes. Our present condition, if we use it skillfully and with wisdom, can be an inspiration to free ourselves from the bondage of suffering.

Sogyal Rinpoche.

Photo by anasshafiq.